Growing Cilantro

Cilantro is pretty easy to grow and happens to be my favorite herb. As if you didn't know by my excitement during Prime Cilantro Growing Time. I actually planted the seeds and forgot about them. 

When and Where to plant? This herb is for the cool season, so it's an annual here in Texas and should be planted in a sunny spot. I made the mistake the first time I tried to grow it in the spring. It didn't last as long. This year, I planted it in October and still have it today. It managed to survive the winter very well.

Growing Time: Besides keeping it watered, it's necessary to harvest it frequently. Not picking it enough is another reason for it bolt. I have given mine plenty of hair cuts and enjoyed many excellent meals.

When it's over, it's over? As we've had some abnormal warmer weather this year, the cilantro is starting to bolt. This means it's about to flower and go to seed. You can tell it's ready to bolt when you see the slimmer leaves. They do not have the best flavor. 

Bolting can be prolonged by 'dead heading' which is simply picking off those sets of leaves.

This punch of cilantro is reaching the end. There are too many bolting leaves to try and save it. When this starts to happen, I start drying the good parts to save for the summer. Then I will let it go to seed, save the seeds and do it all over next fall. This isn't the first one of my herbs to dry. I also Dried Basil after I pulled it from my aquaponics systems.



You either love or hate Cilantro. Being a lover of this herb, I add it to almost everything. One of my favorites is adding it to an omelet with black beans and salsa.

Don't worry, there's a blog for you if you Hate Cilantro. It's clearly no website for me.


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